Ford Motor Co. issued a safety recall to replace the drive shaft in 2017 Ford F-450 and F-550 heavy-duty trucks.

The truck recall effects about 548 vehicles that may experience driveline vibration caused by a powertrain system resonance condition that come on at speeds of more than 75 mph, according to the automaker.

Driving the vehicles at that pace can create a resonance frequency that may fracture the transmission and other driveline components. The result would be a sudden stall or an unintended movement of the truck when the transmission is in park but the parking brake is not applied.

Such a scenario increases the risk of crashes and injuries, Ford said. But the automaker is not aware of collisions or injuries associated with this issue.

The affected trucks include:

  • 2017 F-450/F-550 – Kentucky Assembly Plant, June 6, 2016 to Feb. 21, 2017
  • 2017 F-450/F-550 – Ohio Assembly Plant, Feb. 16, 2016 to Feb. 21, 2017

Ford dealers will replace the two-piece driveshaft with a new three-piece driveshaft and two center bearing brackets at no charge to the customer.

Ford on Wednesday also issued a much larger recall to fix a potential coolant link that can cause a fire in multiple vehicles, including the Escape crossover and Transit Connect van.

The recall includes about 230,000 2014 Ford Escape, 2014-15 Ford Fiesta ST, 2013-14 Ford Fusion and 2013-15 Ford Transit Connect vehicles equipped with 1.6-liter GTDI engines. Ford’s investigation of these vehicles has identified a risk of under-hood fires.

Ford said a lack of coolant circulation in the vehicles could cause an engine to overheat, cracking the cylinder head. A cracked cylinder head can lead to a pressurized oil leak. Oil that comes into contact with a hot engine surface can catch on fire.

The automaker said it is aware of 29 reports of fire associated with this issue in the U.S. and Canada. No injuries have been reported.

Ford plans to mail customers instructions from the owner’s manual on how to check and refill coolant.

“Customers can continue to drive their vehicles, but should see their dealer if their vehicle exhibits a coolant leak, overheating or frequently needs coolant added. When service kits are available, dealers will install a coolant level sensor with supporting hardware and software at no charge to the customer,” the automaker said in a statement.

Related: Ford Invests $1.2 Billion to Support Production of Ranger, Bronco

About The Author

Jerry Hirsch

Jerry Hirsch is a veteran business journalist who is Editor and Vice President of Content of Trucks.com. Prior to joining Trucks.com, Hirsch was nationally known as the automotive writer for the Los Angeles Times. His work has appeared in the Chicago Tribune, San Diego Union-Tribune, Detroit Free Press, Detroit News, the Toronto Star, Consumers Digest and many other publications. He can be found on Twitter: @JerryHirsch.

One Response

  1. Clifford Davis

    What’s going on with the faulty motor on my 2006 F250 diesel? Will there ever be any compensation due to the motor that should have never been put out for the public that had faith and trust for your product. The body is beautiful,but the motor is no good. Please respond with some form of compensation.

    Reply

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