Truck manufacturer Paccar reported net income rose in the second quarter after the company was fined less than expected for its involvement in a European price-rigging scandal.

The maker of Peterbilt, Kenworth, Paccar and DAF trucks said second-quarter earnings — including a favorable adjustment to earnings related to the fine — rose almost 8 percent to $481.3 million compared to the same period a year earlier.

The earnings came in above estimates because the European Commission fine was less than the amount Paccar had reserved funds to cover.

Paccar’s DAF division was fined 752.7 million euros ($826.7 million), the European regulators announced last week. The company said it has sufficient cash to cover the payment and that it would pay within three months. Paccar had originally imposed a $942 million charge in anticipation of the fine.

Volvo, Daimler and Iveco also were fined, and MAN was named in the case but wasn’t fined because it revealed the existence of what the commission called a “cartel” last week.

Paccar, based in Bellevue, Wash., reported second-quarter equipment and financial services revenues of $4.2 billion, down from $4.79 billion a year earlier but in line with forecasts compiled by research firm Capital IQ. Adjusted income was reported at $371.7 million, or $1.06 a share, excluding the favorable charge related to the European Commission fine, the company said.

Truck sales in the second quarter totaled $3.36 billion, missing an estimate for $3.45 billion, while parts sales came in at $756 million versus a forecast for $808 million, said JP Morgan analyst Ann Duignan, in a report after the earnings release.

The company said it would sell 220,000 to 240,000 trucks in the U.S. and Canada this year, down from a previous outlook for 220,000 to 250,000. European truck sales will total 280,000 to 300,000 this year, up 16% year-over-year and on par with prior forecasts, it said.

Paccar reported an operating margin of 11 percent, topping JP Morgan’s forecast for 9.7 percent. Total gross margins came in at 15.2 percent, also beating estimates.

“Overall, we expect the market to react positively to the second-quarter gross margin outperformance,” said Ann Duignan, an analyst at JP Morgan Chase Bank. “Questions are likely to focus on the continued strong gross margin performance on lower volume as well as rising loan loss provisions.”

Research and development spending in the quarter that ended on June 30 increased 2.5 percent year-over-year, reflecting increased spending to advance several technological advancements including integrated powertrain components, advanced driver assistance systems and truck connectivity technologies, said Bob Christensen, Paccar’s president and chief financial officer.