Full-size pickup trucks are still built to handle heavy workloads, and the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado will be no different.

The next-generation version of the iconic Silverado was spotted in a Regular Cab configuration for the first time recently, undergoing high-altitude testing in Colorado.

These photos provide a glimpse of the two-door Silverado ahead of its expected release to U.S. dealerships at the end of 2018. Crew Cab and Double Cab versions of the upcoming Silverado had both been spotted sporting four doors earlier this year.

2019 Chevrolet Silverado. (Photo: Glenn Paulina/Trucks.com)

Silverado and its luxury sibling the GMC Sierra showed new LED headlight designs for the first time in August.

The Silverado Regular Cab seems to share the headlight and daytime running light design seen in earlier prototypes. However, the traditionally spartan two-door version does not use high-tech LED projectors as the other trims do.

Though it only has two doors, the Silverado Regular Cab may offer more room behind the front seats compared to previous generations. Photos with the driver’s side door open indicate there is space in the back for tools and other items.

2019 Chevrolet Silverado. (Photo: Glenn Paulina/Trucks.com)

The black tape behind the driver’s side door also reveals interesting clues. The bodywork, visible for the first time after being cladded in heavy camouflage on previous prototypes, shows sharp design creases that could provide hints to the new Silverado look.

General Motors has been hard at work updating its top-selling vehicle, which is second only to the Ford F-Series in total U.S. sales.

GM will likely outfit the Silverado with an aluminum body in order to save weight and increase fuel economy, though the bed is expected to remain steel. In June the pickup was spotted filling up with diesel fuel, which would be a first for the light-duty Silverado 1500 truck.

2019 Chevrolet Silverado. (Photo: Glenn Paulina/Trucks.com)

Through the first eight months of 2017 the Chevrolet Silverado sold more than 363,000 vehicles, a decrease of 4.4 percent compared to the same period last year.

About The Author

Ryan ZumMallen

Ryan ZumMallen is a Trucks.com staff writer who covers the light truck market. A Long Beach, Calif. resident, his automotive writing has appeared in Car and Driver, Road & Track, The Verge, AutoBytel and elsewhere. He can be found on Twitter: @Zoomy575M

2 Responses

  1. Gregsfc

    The General’ s response for the upcoming model year will be very interesting for this segment. GM will either tell the other brands that it’s okay to just let Ford take off and leave the competition, or it will tell them that they must get ready to put lots of investment in this product line going forward. I predict the latter. Automotive technologies is the interesting part, as Ford has been left all alone going forward since 2015 MY. We know that GM has cylinder deactivation already called AFM, and they have invested in Delphi’ s next generation system called DSF. This could set up DSF versus downsizing and turbo charging for increasing mpg under light loads for different brands. There is also the possibility of adding mold hybrids to the mix, which GM has already added as an option in limited configurations and trims for 2018. The big knock on GM from my point of view regarding trucks is why her they’ll ever add an advanced technology power train and actually try to sell vehicles that offer them. Something Ford usually does. For instance, in the midsize segment, they have the mpg champ of all pickups thanks to a torque 4 cylinder diesel that no one else offers, but when one starts looking at what it takes to get a midsize truck with their diesel, he or she will learn how elusive driving one is and will then understand why they rarely make a splash in the market with any of their well-designed, advanced products.

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